Issue 14 Interviews

Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello is the author of Hour of the Ox (University of Pittsburgh, 2016), which won the 2015 AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry and the 2016 Florida Book Award bronze medal for poetry. She has received poetry fellowships from Kundiman and the Knight Foundation, and her work has appeared in The Adroit Journal, Best New Poets 2015, The Georgia Review, Los Angeles Review of Books, Narrative Magazine, and more.

Marci was interviewed by Yaddyra Peralta for Sliver of Stone.

978-0-8229-6421-6-frontcover

Jan Becker is from a small coal mining town in Pennsylvania. She didn’t stay there very long. She grew up in a Marine Corps family, on military bases all over the United States, and wandered the US for many years before settling in South Florida. She is currently an MFA candidate at Florida International University, and has taught courses there in composition, technical writing, creative writing and poetry. Her work has appeared in Jai-Alai Magazine, Colorado Review, Emerge, Brevity Poetry Review, Sliver of Stone, and the Florida Book Review. She was the winner of the 2015 AWP Intro Journals Award in Nonfiction. Her first book, The Sunshine Chronicles was published by Jitney Books in 2016.

Jan was interviewed for Sliver of Stone Magazine.

jans-cover

Issue 14: Behind the Scenes

Do you ever wonder what Sliver of Stone editors are up to, when they’re not feverishly reading, editing, or soliciting work from writers? We invite you behind the scenes of our magazine.

NICHOLAS GARNETT, Nonfiction Editor

Nick Garnett and co-producer Esther Martinez continue their work on Miami’s home-grown true story live reading event, Lip Service, which is now produced by Miami Book Fair. Upcoming events include an open-mic night on April 27 and Lip Service’s next stage show, on May 20 at the Miracle Theater in Coral Gables. The submission period for the May 20 show runs until April 16. For submission guidelines, visit Lipservicestories.com.

FABIENNE JOSAPHAT, Fiction Editor

Fabienne is on a sabbatical this time around, so that she can focus on her next novel.

A French translation of Dancing In the Baron’s Shadow will be released in Europe this summer. The novel is set in Haiti in 1965, during the repressive and brutal regime of François Duvalier, aka Papa Doc, aka Baron Samedi. The Miami Herald describes it as “an ambitious and impressive first novel, a love letter to Haiti and its people, a tale of two brothers who repeatedly manage to find their way back to each other — and to redemption.”

JENNIFER MARITZA MCCAULEY, Fiction Editor

Jennifer is everywhere! Here’s a link to all the literary journals she works with.

Jennifer’s cross-genre poetry collection SCAR ON/SCAR OFF will be published with Stalking Horse Press this fall. More soon!

She’s currently on a sabbatical.

Jennifer

JUSTIN BENDELL, Fiction Editor

Justin is doing it all, and telling it all in this short Q&A:

Q: Justin, Do you have any writing projects outside of Sliver of Stone?

A: As a matter of fact, I do. In New Mexico, where I live, I have started a literary journal called Manzano Mountain Review. The journal is exclusively online, at least for now, and it seeks writing from former and current New Mexico residents. This isn’t a very wide net, I admit, but we are going to see what kind of subs we get for issue 1. If we feel the need to widen the pool, we will do so. 

If you’ve ever lived in New Mexico, please send us your poems, fiction under 3000 words, creative nonfiction, or visual art! 

If not, I encourage you to check us out at manzanomountainreview.com . Our first issue will debut online November 1, 2017.  

Q: Sounds terrific. Anything else?

A: Yes! A friend and I are developing a noir/crime fiction podcast. It is still in the early planning stages, but our goal will be to chat about / analyze  one critically-acclaimed novel or story collection each month. When we get it up and running, I’ll spread the word. 

Q: You’re certainly keeping busy. 

A: Yeah, I also have a black metal e.p. coming out in April, but that’s for another venue.

justin at todds for bfast

Justin at Todd’s for breakfast

MJ FIEVRE, Founding Editor

MJ’s short play, “If You’re an Orange,” will be produced in South Florida this spring, as part of an event organized by Compositum Musicae Novae (CMN) at the Pinecrest Gardens‘s outdoor amphitheater.

“If You’re an Orange…” is a two-character poetic play about chronic depression.

Who’s involved in the production?

Amy Coker is a graduate of the University of Florida, where she studied Literature, Shakespeare, and Modern Drama. She is the Literary & Programs Manager at City Theatre, as well as an actor and director. Amy most recently stage managed and assistant directed for Mad Cat Theatre. She was recently seen directing for the One-Minute Play Festival and various staged readings, and onstage in Sol Theatre’s The Christmas Carol. Next up Amy will be directing and producing two plays at the Ft. Lauderdale Fringe Festival.

Robert Fritz is a graduate of the University of Miami where he received his BFA in Musical Theatre. He is a member of the Miami Children’s Museum’s team of theatre-makers. He was recently seen around South Florida in See Rock City with Evening Star Productions, The Normal Heart with Outre Theatre, and A Christmas Carol with Actor’s Playhouse. Next up Robert will be seen onstage at the Ft. Lauderdale Fringe Festival, and in Rock Odyssey at the Arsht Center.

Gladys Ramirez is professional director and actor in South Florida. Offstage, she is in her third season as the Artistic Director of The Project [theatre], Miami’s only site-specifc and immersive theatre company. Onstage, she has played with Gablestage, City Theatre, Island City Stage, The Stage Door, Mangrove Creative Collective, Promethean Theatre, Fantasy Theatre Factory, and Parade Productions. A Miami native, she received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Acting from New World School of the Arts.

A note from MJ: “Universe, listen to me, and listen to me good: Writing TV scripts and plays; that’s what makes me happy: That’s what I want to do with the rest of my life: That’s how I want to make a living. You heard me, Universe. Now, make it happen.”

Gladys Ramirez

HOLLY MAYES, Art Editor

Holly is staying busy and healthy.

Holly Mayes

BETTY JO BURO, Nonfiction Editor

Betty Jo Buro talks about her first AWP Conference:

Q: What took you so long to get to AWP?

A: It’s usually in February, somewhere cold, and I prefer not to go places where heavy outerwear is required. Layers make me sad. Plus, I always assumed AWP would overwhelm me. This year, my arm was twisted, I was promised the hotel connected to the convention center, giving me the option to stay completely indoors, and I caved.

Q: So, was it overwhelming?

A: Well, walking the aisles of the Book Fair and recognizing all the literary magazines and journals that have sent me rejections was a little overwhelming. But, I did get to meet some editors who had published my work, and that was cool.

Q: What surprised you?

A: With all the talk of books disappearing in the digital age, you can’t help but leave AWP feeling the opposite, feeling optimistic. Books were everywhere. Books are being published. The book, I’m relieved to report, is alive and well.

Q: What were the highlights for you?

A: I enjoyed the panels, but for me, it was the smaller moments–making new friends with writers in the Starbuck’s line, a Roxane Gay sighting in the lobby bar, a Dim Sum lunch I’m still thinking about, a spontaneous anti-travel ban protest on the book fair floor, hanging with old MFA friends, and witnessing people I love sign their books. The very best part? Being asked by the awesome folks at Cherry Tree magazine to read from one of my essays at Bus Boys and Poets. That night I layered up and ventured out. That night was magical.

Betty Jo

JUBI ARRIOLA-HEADLEY, Copyeditor Extraordinaire

Jubi has been focusing on his poetry, taking two online poetry classes at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, MA. He’s become a reader for By and By Poetry (www.byandbylit.org), for one.  AND he’s been accepted into the poetry workshop at the Lambda Literary Writers Retreat for Emerging LGBTQ Voices this summer in Los Angeles! We’re very excited for him.

Jubi

THOMAS LOGAN, Comics Editor

Thomas is off the grid, devoting himself to his upcoming video games podcast with geek-world experts AJ and Richard. More soon!

Thomas

YADDYRA PERALTA, Poetry Editor

From Yaddyra: “Throughout the year, I work as Assistant Director of Palm Beach Poetry Festival which is going into its 14th year in 2018. While we offer community outreach programs throughout the year, the main event takes place on the week of Martin Luther King Jr Day at Old School Square in Delray Beach. This year, we offered daily poetry workshops in the morning, craft talks in the afternoon and evening poetry readings with poets David Baker, Laure-Anne Bosselaar, Tina Chang, Lynn Emanuel, Daisy Fried, Terrance Hayes, Dorianne Laux, Carl Phillips, and Martha Rhodes. Putting together this many events and making sure all the parts fit is a lot of work, but as a poet, it’s a pleasure to witness Terrance Hayes reading new and unpublished poems; to realize I’ve lived this long without reading David Baker’s muscular and compassionate poetry; to hear Lynn Emmanuel discuss the structure of a book via Langston Hughes’s Selected Poems. We already have the lineup for 2018. Keep an eye on our website palmbeachpoetryfestival.org in the next few weeks for news!”

Photo credit: Old School Square in Delray Beach by Owen McGoldrick.

HECTOR DUARTE JR., IN-TRANSLATOR EDITOR

From Hector:

“I’m glad to be finally graduating this spring from Florida International University’s Creative Writing MFA program. For a second there, I thought it would never happen. Then again, a lot of things happened this past year–globally and otherwise–that I thought never would.

Joe Clifford and Tom Pitts, former flash fiction editors at The Flash Fiction Offensive, were kind enough to ask me to take over as editor there while they buggered off to write their epic novels.

Why, of all people, they picked me, I still can’t figure out. I’m forever grateful, though, and having a blast doing it.

My co-editor is Rob Pierce, a mean mutha out of NorCal.

We’d like to entice–or strong-arm–you to submit a story. Here’s the link: https://outofthegutteronline.submittable.com/submit.

Do it now!”

Hector

Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello: Hour of the Ox

Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello is the author of Hour of the Ox (University of Pittsburgh, 2016), which won the 2015 AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry and the 2016 Florida Book Award bronze medal for poetry. She has received poetry fellowships from Kundiman and the Knight Foundation, and her work has appeared in The Adroit Journal, Best New Poets 2015, The Georgia Review, Los Angeles Review of Books, Narrative Magazine, and more.

Marci was interviewed by Yaddyra Peralta for Sliver of Stone.

Miami poet Marci Calabretta at her home in Coral Gables.
By Scott McIntyre

Without giving away too many secrets, can you talk about Hour of the Ox as a book project? You have created a world that seems all at once imagined, mythical and palpably real. How did this book begin to take shape?

A lot of research went into this book. It started with a few seed poems that dictated the loose narrative of the collection, and as I wrote more poems toward the manuscript, I began to see patterns and holes in the narrative where a poem idea could fit. I like to throw everything into my work to see what juxtapositions come out, so research included reading historical narratives and news articles about the inhabitants of Jeju, Korean folklore, watching Youtube videos of the pearl divers singing, and eating a lot of tangerines. A lot of these poems exist in liminal spaces between the real and imagined.

The first poem in the book is “Anti-Elegy” which reads almost as a catalog of losses and gratitudes. If the anti-elegy were a form, how would you define it?

That’s a great question. I’m not sure such a form would be the perfect opposite to an elegy. I love the idea of a catalog of losses and gratitudes, which in “Anti-Elegy” are the same. I’m very interested in things that appear to be opposites but are more like slant-binaries, if you will. For example, cows and horses, milk and orange juice, love and violence. All of those things might be classed in the same categories or as opposites, depending on context. I would like to think a poetry form like the anti-elegy would capture those pairings in such a catalog. I also think that the list of objective images would create some sort of powerful emotional landscape that adds up to something much deeper than mere grieving. To me, this particular poem serves as a twin for “Songs of Thirst: Six Sijo” and is much like the memory orbs in Pixar’s Inside Out, where a memory is made more complex by the multitude of emotions one can simultaneously feel. I prefer my poems to create an emotional atmosphere through concrete imagery, and while “Anti-Elegy” functions as epigraph, catalog, and cast list for the rest of the manuscript, it also requires real engagement from the reader to know what sort of emotional response they are supposed to have.

One thing that you captured here is the sense of a culture–not just the culture of a nation or ethnicity but also the culture of a family and/or a place–and, in this case, a matriarchal culture. The women in the book figure prominently, while the men move almost like shadows. A lot of this book, I gather, is inspired by the pearl divers of Jeju Island. What about the haenyeo inspired you to write poems?

When I started writing these poems, I was interested in exploring an aspect of Korean history that I had never before had access to as a Korean American adoptee. But then I stumbled upon a New York Times article about the South Korean “sea women” who became the breadwinners and shifted the economic balance on the island. I was enamored of these women in their fifties and sixties who had become such public pillars of the island’s culture by taking the most demeaning jobs. They are also physically powerful. I certainly can’t hold my breath for three minutes while freediving. Pearl-diving is a dying art, too, as the younger generations move on to other careers and these women grow older. The intersectionality of personal family obligations and culture duties within a collectivist society always fascinates me, and I wanted these poems to be able to simultaneously explore both this slice of Korean history and the idea of personal and national duty. The great poet Marilyn Chin once said, “The personal is political.” Within a single family’s experience can resonate many facets of both the history and spirituality of a whole culture.

An interesting aspect of a lot of these poems are the macro-details. The poem “All the Sheep Have Scattered” includes images such as “your hair’s whorl” and “the light sewn into your skin” (which echoes the mother sewing “pearls into my skin” in “Old Country, New Country). I wondered how much of this had to do with influence, not just of your favorite poets or even teachers, but perhaps particular works you were reading while putting together the manuscript.

If I were to create a family tree of all the books that influenced this manuscript, I would certainly include Ai’s Collected Poems; Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities; Louise Glück’s The Wild Iris; everything by Robert Hass; Jane Hirshfield’s Come, Thief; everything by John Keats; Suji Kwock Kim’s Notes from the Divided Country; everything by Li-Young Lee; Osip Mandelstam’s Stolen Air: Selected Poems; everything by Sylvia Plath; Brynn Saito’s The Palace of Contemplating Departure; Richard Siken’s Crush; Tracy K. Smith’s The Body’s Question; Franz Wright’s The Beforelife; and Tina May Hall’s The Physics of Imaginary Objects. From each of these books I saw something different that I wanted to learn, whether it was etherealizing line breaks, emotional landscapes, pinning an abstraction to a concrete image, or stringing a lyric sequence into a loose narrative. During these years, of course, I read too many books to name here, but I treated each text as a textbook, and each poem that came out of it as a kind of exam.

I remember you saying that you like book projects, which I gather to mean collections bound by a strong thematic or narrative thread. Any new book projects on the horizon?

Everything is still in the early stages at this point, but I have a few different projects in the works. I think I’ll forever be a project-based writer. I’ve been writing a series of lyric essays on Korean food, pop culture, and adoption; and always more poems about Korea.

***

Marci serves as a program coordinator for Miami Book Fair and producer for The Working Poet Radio Show. www.marcicalabretta.com.

Kevin Perkins: Acrylic on Paper

Kevin Perkins is a painter living and working in Dallas, Texas. He received his BFA in Communication Design from Louisiana Tech University.

Cossatot (2016), Acrylic on Paper, 13″x9″

Perkins works with synthetic polymer paint on canvas, cotton and paper. Ever enthralled by the natural world, Perkins work conjures up traditional landscape paintings that tend to veer into abstraction.

Greybeard (2016), Acrylic on Paper, 13.5″ x 22″

Perkins’ work intends to evoke a dialogue with the natural landscape with an attentiveness to the present moment without being tied to the particularity of place.

Blue Light Special (2016), Acrylic on Paper, 11.5″ x 8.25″

Check out his website at www.kevinperkins.us.

Jan Becker: The Sunshine Chronicles

Jan Becker is from a small coal mining town in Pennsylvania. She didn’t stay there very long. She grew up in a Marine Corps family, on military bases all over the United States, and wandered the US for many years before settling in South Florida. She is currently an MFA candidate at Florida International University, and has taught courses there in composition, technical writing, creative writing and poetry. Her work has appeared in Jai-Alai Magazine, Colorado Review, Emerge, Brevity Poetry Review, Sliver of Stone, and the Florida Book Review. She was the winner of the 2015 AWP Intro Journals Award in Nonfiction. Her first book, The Sunshine Chronicles was published by Jitney Books in 2016.

Jan was interviewed for Sliver of Stone Magazine.

You recently defended your Masters thesis in creative nonfiction at FIU. It took you eight years to get through the program, but you somehow managed to also publish The Sunshine Chronicles before you defended. How did that happen?

The finished thesis is a collection of essays about “immigrating” to the United States after an abusive childhood in the Marine Corps. It’s a tough program at FIU, and the topic is one of the hardest to write about artfully. After about six years, I switched my focus from a book-length memoir to essay. When I inventoried my drafted work, I found I had enough to defend, and about three other books, but there was one integral piece missing that I needed to pull the collection together. It was the hardest essay I’ve ever written, because it’s about the darkest period of my life, after my stepfather’s death, when I was diagnosed with PTSD and plagued by persistent flashbacks. While I was struggling with that essay, I was going through a rough time personally. Over the course of about a year and a half, my best friend Michael died. I lost my grandmother, and six other people. I went into a deep depression. I couldn’t even look at the thesis during that period, and was finally at the point where I had no choice but to finish or be kicked out of the MFA program, when I was approached about working on The Sunshine Chronicles by my editor at Jitney Books, J.J. Colagrande.

J.J. likes to get things done quickly, whereas I’m more methodical about my work. Some of the essays in my thesis are ones I started working on eighteen years ago. It was a Hail Mary kind of deal. He was looking for one final book to get in the Jitney catalog so he could launch the press. I’d been told I had a book of Facebook posts that were unusual and interesting enough to publish as a book. I sent him the file, without even looking at it, and it turned out to be 2,455 pages of material. He did the work cutting that down to about a 350-page manuscript, but it needed more work, and I was stuck on the thesis with a deadline. And poor, J.J., I don’t think he knew what he was getting into when he approached me. That last essay thesis required me to go back and re-visit a lot of memories I’d been putting off dealing with. I was back in full-blown flashback mode, doing the best I could to get through, and had to tell him, back off. I’m going through something you can’t understand. He respected that I needed space to figure it out, and said, “Yeah, do what you need to do, and the new book will get done when you’re finished.” I’ll always be thankful to J.J. for seeing something in my writing, and having faith enough to say, “you can do this,” because at the time, I was hopeless.

Having the extra pressure on me—coupled with someone believing in my work when I couldn’t—and he wasn’t the only person who believed in my work, he was just the most pushy and vocal–freed me up to finish working on the final essay. I pounded out 5,800 words in a matter of a few hours and sent the manuscript in to my thesis director—who for the first time in eight years didn’t require any revisions. That gave me room to finish trimming back The Sunshine Chronicles. It’s strange, looking back at my writing in that book, that even when I wasn’t working on my thesis, I was writing—and more surprisingly, even when everything seemed dark, I was living.

You’re surprisingly funny in The Sunshine Chronicles, even when you’re writing about serious issues. Can you talk a little about humor?

It has a lot to do with the zeitgeist on social media. When something goes bad in the world, you’re suddenly exposed to overwhelming strife, drama, and competing voices on the internet. Some days I open my Facebook page and read through my newsfeed and I want to jump out the window, because everything feels so bleak and depressing. I can always laugh at absurdity, and the world I live in is extremely absurd. It’s tragic too. I don’t laugh at tragedy, but I can laugh at the situation in my laundry room, or my grandmother’s antics, even when nothing else is funny. There’s also something about approaching a serious topic with humor that is disarming to people who don’t agree with your politics or personal beliefs.

In hindsight, some of the things I wrote about in The Sunshine Chronicles are quite chilling and serious. For example, in one post I wondered what woke the presidential candidates up at 3AM, because I thought it would give the best indication of who they were as people, behind all the slick PR posturing. Now we know. It’s that Neiman Marcus pulled the Ivanka Trump line. That’s heartbreaking to me, and somehow prescient.

The Sunshine Chronicles reminds me a lot of Poor Richard’s Almanac, which was the bestselling book during the American Revolution. Ben Franklin was funny. He looked at the world around him and laughed, despite the terrible oppression of colonial society. I feel we’re due in the United States for a revolution of thought, and there’s got to be some humor in it if it’s going to reach those who view things from an angle obscured by fear and hatred. People are more willing to switch their gaze to a different perspective if it’s entertaining.

Can you talk a little about truth? One of the unusual things about your book is how honest it is. Where do you draw the line on what you share and what you keep hidden?

I try to be careful not to be hurtful with what I write about on social media. It’s not a place to air my grievances. The Winemaker Chronicles, a series of posts about a visitor who consistently overstays his welcome, is an exception to that rule, and he never paid rent while he was here, and was a pain in the ass. The worst houseguest ever. So, with him, it was a way to work out some frustration. I was much kinder to him in the book than he deserved. He’s since sent a cease and desist letter. That just makes me laugh, because there’s no way to shut Jan Becker up once I get started. I’m happy to say he was so disturbed by what I wrote about him that he canceled his annual visit this year.

I’m not afraid to expose my own dirt. I don’t care if people know I see a shrink, because my shrink is a lot crazier than I am, and more people need to see shrinks without feeling it’s something shameful. After growing up in a family with dark secrets, I have no issue with exposing myself, because it frees me up to live my truth, and there’s something empowering about accepting yourself as you are. I have nothing to be ashamed about. I’m human. I think a lot about the motto: E Pluribus Unum. To me, that not only means the United States is one country made up of many pieces, it means that out of all these pieces, one must be an individual. It shouldn’t be so hard to be open, but it’s liberating. No one can define you if you take the time and effort to define yourself.

More importantly, the consequences of being untruthful and too frightened to be honest are too staggering. In an age where one can’t trust the media, being honest with oneself and with one’s vantage point on the world is the only way left for writers to create a truer reality for the future. Even if it’s on my Facebook page. There’s this belief with creative nonfiction, that it’s all really a lie, because as a writer you tell people what you want them to believe. I look at it a little differently. I tell people what I want to believe, and in that way, I come as close as I can to rendering truth.

 

What It Means To Say Sally Hemings, by Ashley Jones

An excerpt from

magic city gospel cover (1)

Bright Girl Sally
Mulatto Sally
Well Dressed Sally
Sally With the Pretty Hair
Sally With the Irish Cotton Dress
Sally With the Smallpox Vaccine
Sally, Smelling of Clean White Soap
Sally Never Farmed A Day In Her Life
Available Sally
Nursemaid Sally
Sally, Filled with Milk
Sally Gone to Paris with Master’s Daughter
Sally in the Chamber with the President
Sally in the Chamber with the President’s Brother
Illiterate Sally
Capable Sally
Unmarried Sally
Sally, Mother of Madison, Harriet, Beverly, Eston
Sally, Mother of Eston Who Changed His Name
Sally, Mother of Eston Hemings Jefferson
Eston, Who Made Cabinets
Eston, Who Made Music
Eston, Who Moved to Wisconsin
Eston, Whose Children Were Jeffersons
Eston, Who Died A White Man
Grandmother Sally of the White Hemingses
Infamous Sally
Silent Sally
Sally, Kept at Monticello Until Jefferson’s Death
Sally, Whose Children Were Freed Without Her

***

ashley jones headshot

Ashley M. Jones received an MFA in Poetry from Florida International University (FIU), where she was a John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Fellow. She served as Official Poet for the City of Sunrise, Florida’s Little Free Libraries Initiative from 2013-2015, and her work was recognized in the 2014 Poets and Writers Maureen Egen Writer’s Exchange Contest and the 2015 Academy of American Poets Contest at FIU. She was also a finalist in the 2015 Hub City Press New Southern Voices Contest, the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award Contest, and the National Poetry Series. Her poems appear or are forthcoming in the Academy of American PoetsTupelo Quarterly, Prelude, Steel Toe Review, Fjords Review, Quiet Lunch, Poets Respond to Race Anthology, Night Owl, The Harvard Journal of African American Public Policy, pluck!, Valley Voices: New York School Edition, Fjords Review: Black American Edition, PMSPoemMemoirStory (where her work was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2016), Kinfolks Quarterly, Tough Times in America Anthology, and Lucid Moose Press’ Like a Girl: Perspectives on Femininity Anthology. She received a 2015 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award and a 2015 B-Metro Magazine Fusion Award. Her debut poetry collection, Magic City Gospel, was published by Hub City Press in January 2017. She serves as an editor of PANK Magazine, and she currently lives in Birmingham, Alabama, where she is a faculty member in the Creative Writing Department of the Alabama School of Fine Arts.

Sliver of Stone: Issue 14

Interviews with Jan Becker and Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello. Visual Art by Allen Forrest and Kevin Perkins. Fiction by Jeff Fleischer, Lois Harrod, and Dean Jollay. Nonfiction by Adina Giannelli, Lisa Gray, and Clayton Littlewood. Poetry by Geraldine Connolly, Mark DeCarteret, Jennifer Gravley, Lois Marie Harrod, Seth Jani, Eleanor Kedney, Matthew Schmeer. New Publications: Ashley Jones and Sapling, Issue 380. Behind the Scenes with Sliver of Stone editors.

INTERVIEWS / FEATURES

VISUAL ART

NONFICTION

POETRY

FICTION

NEW PUBLICATIONS

Klassic Karz 1967 Oldsmobile Tornado, Ink on paper, 12″ x 18″, digital color overlay added

Issue 13 EXTRAS

Because you cannot get enough of Sliver of Stone, here comes a special release: the “Issue 13 EXTRAS,” which includes interviews with crime fiction and comic books writer Alex Segura and poet Parker Phillips, an opinion piece by Jaquira Diaz, and a poem by Miami-based author M.J. Arlett.

While we continue “to provide for a web-based environment for literary fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art from around the globe,” in Issue 13 EXTRAS we are putting a special accent on authors with Caribbean ties, in order to celebrate the launch of the #ReadCaribbean program during the 33rd edition of the Miami Book Fair.

With the support of the Green Family Foundation, the FIU Kimberly Green Latin American and Caribbean Center, and the John S. and James. L Knight Foundation and in partnership with Sosyete Koukouy, Bocas Literary Festival, and ReadJamaica, the Miami Book Fair —the nation’s finest and largest literary gathering at Miami Dade College (MDC)—presents ReadCaribbean, a series of extensive readings and panel discussions highlighting the vibrant and diverse literary culture of the Caribbean.

Happy reading!

INTERVIEWS & OPINION:
Crime & Comics: 5 Questions for Alex Segura (Interview by Thomas Logan)
Parker Phillips: Survival and Creation Outside Academia (Interview by Yaddyra Peralta)
Jaquira Diaz: #NOTMYPRESIDENT

POETRY & ART
For Laura (Who Now Works Sixty-Five Hour Weeks), by M.J. Arlett
Jacqueline Bishop: 3 Poems and Madras Women (#ReadCaribbean)
Ketsia Theodore-Pharel: 3 Poems (#ReadCaribbean)
Geoffrey Philp: 3 Poems (#ReadCaribbean)
Ode to Your Wife, by Anjanette Delgado (#ReadCaribbean)

PROSE
Bounce Theory, by Jacqueline Couti (#ReadCaribbean)
Purge/Porsche, by Danielle Legros Georges (#ReadCaribbean)
A Taste of Eternity, an excerpt, by Gisèle Pineau (#ReadCaribbean)
Bell Mouth Guns, by Sharon Millar (#ReadCaribbean)
That’s Not My Name, by Katia D. Ulysse (#ReadCaribbean)

SHOUT OUT
November 2016: New Publications

*The ReadCaribbean authors listed here will be among dozens of authors from the Caribbean (and the Caribbean diaspora) who will participate in readings and other events at the Miami Book Fair this year.

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Issue 13 Interviews

Ed Kurtz is the author of The Rib From Which I Remake the World and other novels. His short fiction has appeared in Thuglit, Shotgun Honey, Needle, and numerous anthologies including Best American Mystery Stories 2014 and Best Gay Stories 2014. Kurtz lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Ed was interviewed by Hector Duarte Jr. for Sliver of Stone Magazine.

ed

Julie Marie Wade was born and raised in Seattle, Washington. She holds a Master of Arts in English from Western Washington University, a Master of Fine Arts in Poetry from the University of Pittsburgh, and a PhD in Interdisciplinary Humanities from the University of Louisville. She is the author of four poetry collections: Without, Postage Due, When I was Straight, and SIX. Her nonfiction titles include Small Fires, Tremolo, and Wishbone: A Memoir in Fractures. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and prizes and her poetry and creative nonfiction have been published widely in journals and literary magazines.

Wade teaches in the creative writing program at Florida International University and reviews regularly for The Rumpus and Lambda Literary Review.  She is married to Angie Griffin and lives in south Florida.

Catechism: A Love Story was published by Noctuary Press in 2016.

Julie was interviewed by Betty Jo Buro for Sliver of Stone Magazine.

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Sliver of Stone: Issue 13

Interviews with Ed Kurtz, Parker Philips, and Julie Marie Wade. Visual Art by Carlos Franco-Ruiz and Jayne Marek. Fiction by Gordon Adler, Charles Brooks, Timothy Caldwell, Susan Chehak, Mitchell Grabois, Mike Koenig, Ellen Birkett Morris, Rajeev Prasad, and John Thompson. Nonfiction by Jacqueline Heinze and Ellene Glenn Moore. Poetry by Marie-Andree Auclair, Emma BoldenDouglas Cole, Darren DemareeChloe Firetto-Toomey, W.F. Lantry, Naomi Ruth Lowinsky, Laura Merleau, Bryan Narendorf, Scott Slisbe, and Kelly Weber.

New Publications by Paul David Adkins and Geoffrey Philp. Meet Jubi, our new intern.

INTERVIEWS / FEATURES

VISUAL ART

NONFICTION

POETRY

 FICTION

NEW PUBLICATIONS

Because you cannot get enough of Sliver of Stone, here comes a special release: the “Issue 13 EXTRAS,” which includes interviews with crime fiction and comic books writer Alex Segura and poet Parker Phillips, an opinion piece by Jaquira Diaz, and a poem by Miami-based author M.J. Arlett.

While we continue “to provide for a web-based environment for literary fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art from around the globe,” in Issue 13 EXTRAS we are putting a special accent on authors with Caribbean ties, in order to celebrate the launch of the #ReadCaribbean program during the 33rd edition of the Miami Book Fair.

With the support of the Green Family Foundation, the FIU Kimberly Green Latin American and Caribbean Center, and the John S. and James. L Knight Foundation and in partnership with Sosyete Koukouy, Bocas Literary Festival, and ReadJamaica, the Miami Book Fair —the nation’s finest and largest literary gathering at Miami Dade College (MDC)—presents ReadCaribbean, a series of extensive readings and panel discussions highlighting the vibrant and diverse literary culture of the Caribbean.

Happy reading!

INTERVIEWS & OPINION:
Crime & Comics: 5 Questions for Alex Segura (Interview by Thomas Logan)
Parker Phillips: Survival and Creation Outside Academia (Interview by Yaddyra Peralta)
Jaquira Diaz: #NOTMYPRESIDENT

POETRY & ART
For Laura (Who Now Works Sixty-Five Hour Weeks), by M.J. Arlett
Jacqueline Bishop: 3 Poems and Madras Women (#ReadCaribbean)
Ketsia Theodore-Pharel: 3 Poems (#ReadCaribbean)
Geoffrey Philp: 3 Poems (#ReadCaribbean)
Ode to Your Wife, by Anjanette Delgado (#ReadCaribbean)

PROSE
Bounce Theory, by Jacqueline Couti (#ReadCaribbean)
Purge/Porsche, by Danielle Legros Georges (#ReadCaribbean)
A Taste of Eternity, an excerpt, by Gisèle Pineau (#ReadCaribbean)
Bell Mouth Guns, by Sharon Millar (#ReadCaribbean)
That’s Not My Name, by Katia D. Ulysse (#ReadCaribbean)

SHOUT OUT
November 2016: New Publications

*The ReadCaribbean authors listed here will be among dozens of authors from the Caribbean (and the Caribbean diaspora) who will participate in readings and other events at the Miami Book Fair this year.

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